Visitors in galleries during the Grad Show 2018 opening.

The Manetti Shrem Museum builds on the university’s legacy of excellence in the arts to bring the transformational power of art to everyone. We are committed to offering engaging experiences that reflect and serve the UC Davis community through our public events and programs.

Download the Fall 2019 Season Program Brochure.

Download the Winter 2020 Season Program Brochure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo of book cover.

Art Studio Visiting Artist Lecture Series
Amelia Jones

Thursday, December 5
4:30–6 PM

Amelia Jones is Robert A. Day Professor and Vice Dean of Research, Roski School of Art & Design, USC, and is a curator and scholar of contemporary art, performance, and feminist/sexuality studies. Recent publications include Seeing Differently: A History and Theory of Identification and the Visual Arts (2012); co-edited with Erin Silver, Otherwise: Imagining Queer Feminist Art Histories (2016); and the edited special issue “On Trans/Performance” of Performance Research (2016). Jones is currently working on a retrospective of the work of Ron Athey with accompanying catalogue (Queer Communion: Ron Athey) and a book entitled In Between Subjects: A Critical Genealogy of Queer Performance is forthcoming from NYU Press.

This lecture is co-sponsored by the UC Davis Department of Art History. 

 

 

 

 

 

Artist-Led Workshops & Salons

We are pleased to introduce two fall programs in the Carol and Gerry Parker Art Studio. The Drop-In Studio and Evening Salons are led by regional artists and developed to engage the community and makers of all levels. 

The first weekend of each month, meet regional artists who will introduce themselves and their series of month-long art-making drop-in workshops inspired by the museum’s exhibitions, with an emphasis on materials and experimentation. Each artist will also host a Thursday evening gathering designed for other artists and the creative community, where they will give a short talk about their practice as a prelude to conversation and artistic exchange. Light refreshments will be provided. Free with RSVP (required; space is limited); please call (530) 752-6362.

 

Featured Artists

October 5–27: Roma DevanbuPhoto of Roma Devanbu
Roma Devanbu grew up on the East Coast and moved to Davis over 20 years ago. Her extensive international art pilgrimages have resulted in a fascination with the human compulsion to decorate. She has a studio residency at Verge Center for the Arts and is a member of Axis Gallery, both in Sacramento. 

 

 

November 2–December 1: Steph Rue Photo of Steph Rue
Steph Rue is a Sacramento book artist and papermaker. She received her master of fine arts in book arts from the University of Iowa Center for the Book in 2015 and studied traditional Korean book and papermaking in South Korea on a 2015-16 Fulbright grant.

 

 

December 7–29: Patris MillerPhoto of Patris Miller
In 2012, Patris Miller opened her own studio and gallery in Oak Park, where she creates art, teaches drawing and painting, holds life drawing and painting sessions, and coordinates art exhibits and events. Her work–whether figurative, still life or en plein air–is based on painting and drawing from life.

 

Workshop
Symmetry, Pattern and Variation

Saturdays & Sundays, October 5–27
2–4 PM

Explore the power of pattern and symmetry to create a sense of visual order and harmony. Vary the elements to create rhythm. Add in a touch of chance to encounter delightfully surprising images. Using a variety of materials and methods, Roma Devanbu will share her process and provide support as you discover your own ways of using symmetry, pattern and variation.

Salon
Someplace Between Chaos and an Endless Grid  

Thursday, October 10
7–8:30 PM

Roma Devanbu will talk about her attempts to find balance in her compositions, and in her art making process, and facilitate an open discussion about how much and what type of order salon participants find useful in their own creative endeavors. 

 

Workshop
Joomchi: Playing with Paper 

Saturdays & Sundays, November 2–December 1
2–4 PM

Create a unique landscape using a traditional paper-felting technique called joomchi. We will be using hanji (Korean paper), a strong and durable material to explore a variety of ways to collage, felt and fuse paper into interesting textures. Steph Rue will share a variety of joomchi techniques as well as other ways to work with this unique material. Prepare to get your hands wet and come play with paper!

Salon
Patchwork Practice: Creating Within Boundaries

Thursday, November 21
7–8:30 PM

Steph Rue will demonstrate her process of making paper collages using scraps, a technique used in making bojagi (Korean wrapping cloths). Participants will have the opportunity to make a small paper collage using leftover scraps from the art studio. Steph will also discuss how artists make work with limited time, space and materials — and how these limitations can feed our creative practices.

 

 

Workshop
Environments and Mark-Making 

Saturdays & Sundays, December 7–29
2–4 PM

Experiment with variety of mark-making techniques to add a sense of realism to your drawings. Using basic geometric shapes and a variety of materials, explore new ways of drawing the world around you with simple techniques and methods. Patris will share her process and encourage participants to explore their own ideas of creating a sense of dimensionality on a 2-D surface. 

Salon
Connections Between Artist and Place

Thursday, December 19
7–8:30 PM

Throughout the centuries, artists have narrated their environment in a variety of ways and used the art-making process and creative passion to make meaningful connections between themselves and the world around them. Patris Miller will share how her personal vision became the  inspiration behind her Oak Park Broadway Rain Series.

Artist-Led Workshops will continue into 2020 with artists Manuel Fernando Rios, Elizabeth Corkery and Ianna Nova Frisby.

 

Winter Season Celebration

Photo of the museum canopy lit with purple light at night.
Photo by Adam Taylor

Sunday, January 26
3–5 PM

First-generation UC Davis artists are featured in two compelling new exhibitions opening at this event: Stephen Kaltenbach: The Beginning and The End and Gesture: The Human Figure After Abstraction | Selections from the Manetti Shrem Museum. We will also celebrate a complementary installation of Manuel Neri sculptures outside the museum’s West facade. 

Artist Talk, 3:30 PM
Exhibiting artist Stephen Kaltenbach will be in conversation with guest curators Constance Lewallen and Ted Mann.

  • Enjoy art activities for the young, and young at heart
  • Hear live music from Mediocre Café
  • As always, the event is free for all!

 

Faculty Book SeriesCover of book Digital Uncanny with man's face erased
Kriss Ravetto-Biagioli: 
Digital Uncanny 

Wednesday, February 5
4:30–6 PM

Digital Uncanny examines the relation of surveillance to the uncanny, anonymity, and gesture and facial recognition in interactive media. Through a close reading of interactive and experimental art works, Digital Uncanny forces us to reflect on our relationship with computational media and by extension, our relationship to one another and our experience of the world.

Kriss Ravetto-Biagioli is a professor of Cinema and Digital Media and professor of Science and Technology Studies at UC Davis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thiebaud Endowed Lecture: Leonardo Drew

Photo of artist Leonardo Drew
Photo: Randy Dodson, courtesy of Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco.
 

Thursday, February 6
4:30–6 PM

Leonardo Drew is known for creating reflective abstract sculptural works that play upon the dystopian tension between order and chaos, recalling post-minimalist sculpture that alludes to America’s industrial past, as well as the plight of African Americans throughout U.S. history. One could find many meanings in his work, but ultimately the cyclical nature of life and decay can be seen in his grids of transformed raw material to resemble and articulate entropy and a visual erosion of time.

Drew first exhibited his work at the age of 13. He went on to attend the Parsons School of Design and received his bachelor of fine arts from the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in 1985. His work has been shown nationally and internationally, and is included in numerous collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Guggenheim, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; and the Tate, London. He collaborated with choreographer Merce Cunningham on the production of Ground Level Overlay (1995). New York Times art critic Roberta Smith describes his large reliefs as “pocked, splintered, seemingly burned here, bristling there, unexpectedly delicate elsewhere. An endless catastrophe seen from above. The energies intimated in these works are beyond human control, bigger than all of us.” He lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

 

 

 

 

 

Davis Human Rights Lecture Series: Change Begins With Your Own LiberationPhoto of Gilda Gonzales.

Thursday, February 13
7–8:30 PM

Gilda Gonzales became CEO of Planned Parenthood Northern California (PPNorCal) on June 5, 2017. She provides the executive leadership for one of the largest Planned Parenthood affiliates in the country, which delivers care to 88,000 patients at 18 health centers as well as education and advocacy programs throughout 20 Northern California counties. She is the first Latina to serve as CEO of a California Planned Parenthood affiliate, which she initially joined in February 2014 as senior vice president of external affairs. 

She has a master’s degree in public administration and a bachelor’s of science in industrial psychology. Gonzales is an Alameda County Women’s Hall of Fame inductee, and one of St. Mary’s College of California’s 40 Most Influential Women Graduates. She grew up in California’s Central Valley and currently lives in Oakland with her husband, Ken Wysocki, Ph.D.

The Davis Human Rights Lecture Series is co-sponsored by the UC Davis Human Rights Studies Program and the Manetti Shrem Museum.

 

 

 

 

Robert Arneson’s “Black Pictures”: Race, Politics and Personal PainPhoto of Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw
Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw

Sunday, February 23
2:30 PM

This talk examines a controversial group of art works made by Robert Arneson toward the end of his career. Created with great passion and in a variety of media, these objects show the artist wrestling with complex ideas about racial stereotyping, political demagoguery and his own identity as he simultaneously battled the debilitating cancer that would take
his life in 1992.

In winter 2020, Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw is serving as the Manetti Shrem Museum’s first Visiting Museum Researcher. Shaw studies issues of race, gender, sexuality and class in the art of the U.S., Latin America and the Caribbean. She has taught at art history and American studies at Harvard University, the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Washington. In 2019, she was appointed Director of History, Research, and Scholarship and senior historian at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery. Shaw has published extensively; her most widely read titles include Seeing the Unspeakable: The Art of Kara Walker (2004) and Portraits of a People: Picturing African Americans in the Nineteenth Century. She has curated several major exhibitions, notably, Represent: 200 Years of African American Art for the Philadelphia Museum of Art (2015), and Kara Walker: Virginia’s Lynch Mob and Other Works for the Montclair Art Museum in New Jersey (2018).

 

 

 

Art Studio Visiting Artist Lecture Series: Jonathan CalmPhoto of artist Jonathan Calm.

Thursday, February 27
4:30–6 PM

A native New Yorker, Jonathan Calm is a visual artist in the media of photography and video whose work combines and challenges the aesthetic and ideological tenets of architecture, documentary journalism and sculpture. A central theme is the relationship between photography and urban architecture, and the powerful role of images in the way architectural constructs shape the lives of individuals and communities. Calm’s art practice has been featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions, including Frequency at the Studio Museum in Harlem (2005); Role Play at the Tate Britain (2006); and Rooted Movements at LMAKprojects in New York City (2014). He has been covered in the New York Times, Art in America, the New Yorker, the Village Voice, Artforum and the Washington Post. Calm is an assistant professor of art practice at Stanford University.

 

 

 

Faculty Book SeriesCover of book Racial Worldmaking with two people looking at a building.
Mark C. Jerng
Racial Worldmaking: The Power of Popular Fiction

Wednesday, March 4
4:30–6 PM

Racial Worldmaking takes up particular popular genres—future war; plantation romance; sword and sorcery; alternate history—in order to analyze how genre formations inform our perceptual organizations of race and world. In doing so, it engages questions central to our current moment: In what ways do we participate in racist worlds, and how can we imagine and build one that is anti-racist?

Mark C. Jerng is a professor of English at UC Davis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The China Shop: Artists in Science LabsPhoto of white and black blobs on red background.

Wednesday, March 11 and Wednesday, June 3
4:30–6 PM

The China Shop is a new faculty-led initiative funded by National Endowment for the Arts’ Art Works project. Conceived by UC Davis professors Timothy Hyde (Art Studio) and Jiayi Young (Design), this unprecedented two-year endeavor creates a space for challenging inquiries at the intersection of disciplines. Playing off the idea of “a bull in a china shop,” artists are invited to work with scientists and their lab staff to repurpose the tools and infrastructure of scientific research in unexpected ways. The paired artist and scientist will discuss their creative work, system of collaboration, and works in progress in two public conversations.

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. We thank the Dean’s Office of Letters and Science, the Office of Research, and the Manetti Shrem Museum for their generous matching support. This event is also a part of the Leonardo Art, Science, Evening Rendezvous (LASER) series and is published in ARTECA, a curated spacefor essential content linking the arts, sciences and technologies (MIT Press).

 

 

 

 

Art Studio Visiting Artist Lecture: Francis Stark

Photo of Francis Stark's artwork featuring three black canvases.
Frances Stark, Black Flag, Oil on canvas, four panels total: 72 x 93 in. each. Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise, New York/Rome

Thursday, March 12
4:30–6 PM

Frances Stark’s drawings, collages, videos, PowerPoint presentations, performances and paintings have been extensively exhibited in museums and galleries worldwide. In 2017, a new suite of her paintings was included in the Whitney Biennial; her cinematic opera, The Magic Flute, premiered at LACMA; and an earlier work was featured in the Venice Biennale. In 2015, Stark’s sprawling mid-career survey, UH-OH: Frances Stark 1991-2015, opened at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, before traveling to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Stark’s work has been included in prominent exhibitions such as the 2013 Carnegie International, the 2011 Venice Biennale and the 2008 Whitney Biennial. She lives and works in Los Angeles, California.

 

 

Art Studio Visiting Artist Lecture: Beatriz Cortez

Photo of artwork by Beatriz Cortez with glass and metal in a dome shape.
Beatriz Cortez, 105 Point Hood Shield from Trinidad: Joy Station (2019), at Craft Contemporary. Courtesy of the artist and Commonwealth and Council, Los Angeles. Photo: Gina Clyne.

Thursday, April 2
4:30–6 PM

Beatriz Cortez has lived in the United States since 1989. She received a master of fine arts in art from the California Institute of the Arts in 2015, and a doctorate in literature and cultural studies from Arizona State University in 1999. Cortez’s work explores simultaneity, life in different temporalities, and different versions of modernity, particularly in relation to post-war memory and loss, migration and imagining possible futures. She has had several solo exhibitions in Los Angeles, and her work is currently on view as part of Chronos, Cosmos: Deep Time, Open Space at the Socrates Sculpture Park, N.Y.; Mundos Alternos: Art and Science Fiction in the Americas at the Queens Museum, N.Y.; and Candelilla, Coatlicue, and the Breathing Machine at Ballroom Marfa, Marfa, Texas.  She teaches in the Department of Central American Studies at California State University, Northridge.

 

 

Picnic Day

Photo of kids riding bikes at the museum's summer event.
Photo by Meagan Lucy

Saturday, April 18
11 AM–5 PM

Stop by the Manetti Shrem Museum on Picnic Day for art viewing, art enjoying and art making. Join us under the Bill and Nancy Roe Grand Canopy for creative activities in the shade and visit our exhibitions. The museum is free for all!

 

 

 

 

The Architecture of the Museum in the Age of Spectacle: Presentation by Talinn GrigorPhoto of Talinn Grigor

Sunday, April 26
2:30–4:30 PM

Art History Chair Talinn Grigor will discuss the relationship of architecture to the institution of the museum and will touch on the Manetti Shrem Museum’s architecture and how it shapes visitors’ experience. Grigor received her doctorate from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2005. Her books include Building Iran: Modernism, Architecture, and National Heritage under the Pahlavi Monarchs (2009); Contemporary Iranian Art: From the Street to the Studio (2014); and Persian Kingship and Architecture: Strategies of Power in Iran from the Achaemenids to the Pahlavis, with Sussan Babaie (2015). Her articles have appeared in the Art Bulletin, Getty Journal, Third Text, Future Anterior and Iranian Studies, among others.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Creative Writing Reading Series: Public ExecutionsArtwork called 'Baby Teeth' with blue and white abstract objects.

Tuesday, April 28
4:30–6 PM

Katie Peterson and Joe Wenderoth, core members of the UC Davis Graduate Writing faculty, will present. Both poets will read and perform original works. Unlike a traditional poetry reading, this multimedia event will feature live and recorded sound and video projection. Katie Peterson is the author of four poetry collections, including A Piece of Good News. Joe Wenderoth is the author of many collections of poetry and prose, including Letters to Wendy’s.

The performance contains mature themes, and is not recommended for children.

 

 

 

Art Studio Visiting Artist Lecture: Meg ShifflerPhoto of Meg Shiffler.

Thursday, April 30
4:30–6 PM

Meg Shiffler has been the galleries director for the San Francisco Arts Commission (SFAC), the arts agency of the City and County of San Francisco, since 2005. She curates exhibitions featuring artists who provoke dialogue around contemporary art and broad civic and social issues. She has launched new initiatives including a global Sister City exhibition exchange program, and a residency program placing artists within city departments. Shiffler has taught in the School of Interdisciplinary Studies at the San Francisco Art Institute, and is a member of Stanford Universities’ Creative Cities Working Group. She produced a regular column about collaboration for SFMOMA’s Open Space blog, and writes about contemporary art and multidisciplinary practice. She contributed to Show Me the Picture (Chronicle Books, 2019), a survey of photographs by Jim Marshall, and a catalog of her exhibition Jeremy Fish: O Glorious City (Chronicle Books, 2017).

 

 

 

The Scholar as Curator SeriesPhoto of book by Roger Sansi.
The Anthropologist as Curator: Roger Sansi (Universitat de Barcelona) 

Wednesday, May 6
4:30–6 PM

Why do contemporary art curators define their work as ethnography? How can curation illuminate the practice of contemporary anthropology? Does anthropology risk disappearing as a disciplinary heritage within the general model of the curatorial? Roger Sansi, editor of the upcoming book The Anthropologist As Curator (2020), shares the process of collecting the perspectives of international scholars working at the intersection of anthropology, contemporary art, museum studies, curatorial studies and heritage studies.

Programmed by Tarek Elhaik (associate professor, Anthropology) and the AIL: Anthropology of the Image lab in partnership with the Manetti Shrem Museum and with support of the Mellon-Sawyer Series on Branding Cultural Heritage.

 

 

 

 

 

Arts & Humanities 2020 Graduate Exhibition

Photo of visitors in the museum at Grad Show 2019.
Photo by Meagan Lucy

Opening Celebration
Thursday, May 28
6–9 PM

Experience new ways of seeing and understanding the past and future in this multidisciplinary exhibition from UC Davis graduate students in the Arts and Humanities. The opening celebration features performances by master’s and doctoral students, as well as the presentation of the Keister & Allen Art Purchase Prize and the Savageau Award in the Department of Design.

 

The 2020 Annual Art History Graduate Colloquium
Saturday, May 30
1–4 PM

Learn about the work of this year’s UC Davis Art History master’s degree candidates in the culmination of their thesis work. Lectures are followed by
the presentation of the 2020 Art History Undergraduate Awards.

 

The China Shop: Artists in Science LabsPhoto of white and black blobs on red background.

Wednesday, June 3
4:30–6 PM

The China Shop is a new faculty-led initiative funded by National Endowment for the Arts’ Art Works project. Conceived by UC Davis professors Timothy Hyde (Art Studio) and Jiayi Young (Design), this unprecedented two-year endeavor creates a space for challenging inquiries at the intersection of disciplines. Playing off the idea of “a bull in a china shop,” artists are invited to work with scientists and their lab staff to repurpose the tools and infrastructure of scientific research in unexpected ways. The paired artist and scientist will discuss their creative work, system of collaboration, and works in progress in two public conversations.

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. We thank the Dean’s Office of Letters and Science, the Office of Research, and the Manetti Shrem Museum for their generous matching support. This event is also a part of the Leonardo Art, Science, Evening Rendezvous (LASER) series and is published in ARTECA, a curated spacefor essential content linking the arts, sciences and technologies (MIT Press).

 

 

 

 

Art Studio Activities

Weekly drop-in workshops continue this winter in the Carol and Gerry Parker Art Studio. Each month, community artists lead weekend studio sessions and evening salons designed to engage the community and makers of all levels.

Drop in and get inspired as these artists facilitate activities in the Parker Art Studio. Experiment with various materials through prompts inspired by the museum’s exhibitions and the artist’s own art work. Join us the first weekend of each month to hear about each artist’s practice. 

Each artist will also host a Thursday evening gathering designed for other artists and the creative community, and give a short talk about their practice as a prelude to conversation and artistic exchange. Light refreshments will be served. Free with RSVP (required; space is limited); please call (530) 752-6362. 

 

Featured Artists

February 1–March 1: Manuel Fernando Rios
Manuel Fernando Rios is a West Sacramento artist and curator. He is a member of Axis Gallery and Verge Center for the Arts’ board of directors. Rios earned his bachelor of arts and master of arts degrees in studio art from California State University, Sacramento, and received his master of fine arts with an emphasis on painting from the University of California, Davis. He currently teaches at Sacramento City College and Sierra College. 

March 7–29: Elizabeth Corkery
Elizabeth Corkery’s work—which incorporates printmaking, digital media, sculpture and installation—reflects on the inherent contradictions of fine arts, craft and design as they relate to the history and politics surrounding decoration and ornamentation. She is also the founder/director of the international printmaking collaborative and publisher Print Club Ltd. She received her master of fine arts from Cornell University and lives and works in Sacramento.

April 4–May 10: Ianna Frisby
Ianna Frisby is a sculptor and adjunct professor in Sacramento. Although ceramics is her first love, her body of work also includes installations, embroidery, printmaking, mixed media sculpture, found-and altered objects, and public art projects. She is the co-founder of the Art Advice Booth and maintains a studio at Verge Center for the Arts.

 

Drop-in Workshop

Photo of artwork by Manuel Fernando Rios.
Manuel Fernando Rios, Can't See My Reflection.


Image Transfer and the Element of Surprise

Saturdays & Sundays, February 1–March 1
2–4 PM

Get inspired by surrealist experiments and engage with the art of image transfer with Manuel Fernando Rios. Try out different combinations of image transfers and adding paint to transform your work. Merge the recognizable world with an abstract dreamscape and see how those worlds converse with each other. Manuel will guide you through the process and introduce new ideas of how to approach your artmaking process. 

Artist Salon
Decisions, Decisions: Questions in the Practice

Thursday, February 6
7–8:30 PM

In his work, Manuel Fernando Rios mixes abstraction with figurative imagery that explores the idea of self-identification and its external and internal complexities. Come hear about his process of deciding which parts of his work are abstract, and what he keeps identifiable. Join the discussion and dig into the challenging questions we ask ourselves during the art-making processes. Light refreshments will be served. Free with RSVP (required; space is limited); please call (530) 752-6362. 

 

Drop-in Workshop

Photo of artist Elizabeth Corkery.
Photo: Carlos Avendaño, Fabric Workshop
and Museum


Paper Theaters, Imagined Spaces

Saturdays & Sundays, March 7–29
2–4 PM

Join artist Elizabeth Corkery in the studio and explore ways of creating small-scale theatrical environments inspired by the design of Victorian toy theaters. Learn the basics of making these paper structures and set your own mini-stage! Using a variety of narrative and thematic prompts, Elizabeth will introduce methods of combining collage, monoprint and stencil techniques to design and make paper theater scenery.

Artist Salon
King Effect: Aerial Views, Vantage Points and Evolving Perspectives 

Thursday, March 26
7–8:30 PM

Elizabeth Corkery will discuss her ongoing interest in the history of garden design and garden representation as an evolving structure of narrative and power. In conjunction with a viewing of Doug Aitken’s NEW ERA installation, Elizabeth will forge connections between the scenographic perspectives of Aitken’s piece and a variety of design strategies employed in the environment of the Renaissance garden and its various representations: mirror rooms, follies, grottos, the centrality of the single point perspective, exaggerated symmetry, overhead “bird’s-eye” views and their contemporary descendant, the aerial drone shot. Light refreshments will be served. Free with RSVP (required; space is limited); please call (530) 752-6362.

 

Drop-in Workshop

Photo of artwork by Ianna Frisby, Grotto
Ianna Frisby, Grotto.


Rag Rug Project

Saturdays & Sundays, April 4–May 10
2–4 PM 

Try your hand at the art of rag-rug making with artist Ianna Frisby. Help create a large community tapestry or work on your own mini weaving. Explore textile patterns from world history and find ways to add your own imagery through stamps and printmaking. 

Artist Salon
Artist Tour 2.0

Thursday, April 30
7-8:30 PM

Ianna Frisby will be your tour guide for an evening that starts with her sharing her journey to becoming an artist, through her background, interests and artwork. Then follow along on a gallery tour with the Ianna to view and discuss works from the new exhibition Stephen Kaltenbach: The Beginning and The EndLight refreshments will be served. Free with RSVP (required; space is limited); please call (530) 752-6362.