Related Programs

The Annual Art History Graduate Colloquium
Bending Perceptions
Saturday, June 3  |  1–4 PM

Art History MA candidates present their research projects including Chinese Buddhist painting, the Fountain of Four Rivers obelisk, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, transgenerational trauma, craft activism, and cannibalism in Latin American art. 

Gallery Talks

A series of public presentations with graduate students exploring their research and practice.

Sunday, June 4  |  2–3:30 PM
Faith Sponsler 
MFA Program, Art Studio 
2 PM

Providing unique access to an artist’s thought processes and inspiration, Sponsler will read excerpts from her notebooks. Coffee and small prints will be served.

Miguel Novoa 
PhD Program, History
2:30 PM

Using Afro-Peruvian scholar Nicomedes Santa Cruz’s poetry as inspiration, Novoa will discuss the process of uncovering the systematically hidden history of Black Peru. 

Muzi Li Rowe
MFA Program, Art Studio 
3 PM

The artist will introduce and demonstrate the process of making wet plate collodion tintypes. This work builds a dialogue between this traditional medium and contemporary art practice.

Thursday, June 8  |  6–8:30 PM
Corrie Hendricks
MA Program, Art History 
6–8 PM

Beginner and experienced knitters are invited to gather in a "knitting circle" and practice stitch techniques while discussing craft-activism within the current political climate. Tools and materials will be provided.

Arielle Rebek 
MFA Program, Art Studio
6–8 PM

Participants are invited to join the artist in a conversation about her collection of found and gifted archives, as well as sharing their own images and related stories.

Kelly Sharp 
PhD Program, History
7 PM

Focused on a pivotal point in her larger “farm-to-fork” history of provisioning Charleston, South Carolina, between 1800 and 1840, Sharp discusses the role of white slaveholding women’s recipe collections and the enslaved black women who performed the labor of cooking the meals. 

Virginia Van Dine 
MA Program, Art History
7:30 PM

Van Dine’s thesis and conversation consider the obelisk present in Bernini’s seventeenth-century marble Fountain of the Four Rivers. She asserts that it is a Christian relic imbued with sacred meaning while advertising the political aspirations of its commissioner, Pope Innocent X.

Saturday, June 10  |  2 – 3 PM
Renata McRee 
MA Program, Art History
2 PM

McRee leads a conversation comparing the landscape and flower paintings of 17th century artist Zhu Da with the museum’s current exhibition of Marc Johnson’s film YúYú and exploring their relationship to the Buddhist philosophical concept of emptiness. 

Chelsea Hicks Bryan 
MA Program, Creative Writing
2:30 PM

The author will present a 1950s-style “story time” radio show of her novel Echo. Set in 1950s Bartlesville, Oklahoma, Echo tells the story of Elsie, a mixed-race Osage/white woman disowned from her privileged oil-wealthy family following an illegitimate pregnancy on the reservation.

Sunday, June 11  |  2 - 3 PM
Lorella Silvestri 
MA Program, Art History
2 PM

Exploring New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art, Silvestri discusses the significance of originals and replicas, a complex issue to be understood within the large context of cultural history.

Jamil Kochai 
MA Program, Creative Writing
2:30 PM

The author reads poetry and excerpts from his novel 99 Nights in Logar, which follows the story of a twelve year old Afghan-American named Marwand Ahmadzi, who, in the summer of 2005, returns to his parents’ ancestral village in Logar, Afghanistan.