Faculty Book Series

Cover of book Digital Uncanny with man's face erased


Kriss Ravetto-Biagioli: Digital Uncanny 

Wednesday, February 5
4:30–6 PM

Digital Uncanny examines the relation of surveillance to the uncanny, anonymity, and gesture and facial recognition in interactive media. Through a close reading of interactive and experimental art works, Digital Uncanny forces us to reflect on our relationship with computational media and by extension, our relationship to one another and our experience of the world.

Kriss Ravetto-Biagioli is a professor of Cinema and Digital Media and professor of Science and Technology Studies at UC Davis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thiebaud Endowed Lecture: Leonardo Drew

Photo of artist Leonardo Drew
Photo: Randy Dodson, courtesy of Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco.

Thursday, February 6
4:30–6 PM

Leonardo Drew is known for creating reflective abstract sculptural works that play upon the dystopian tension between order and chaos, recalling post-minimalist sculpture that alludes to America’s industrial past, as well as the plight of African Americans throughout U.S. history. One could find many meanings in his work, but ultimately the cyclical nature of life and decay can be seen in his grids of transformed raw material to resemble and articulate entropy and a visual erosion of time.

Drew first exhibited his work at the age of 13. He went on to attend the Parsons School of Design and received his bachelor of fine arts from the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in 1985. His work has been shown nationally and internationally, and is included in numerous collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Guggenheim, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; and the Tate, London. He collaborated with choreographer Merce Cunningham on the production of Ground Level Overlay (1995). New York Times art critic Roberta Smith describes his large reliefs as “pocked, splintered, seemingly burned here, bristling there, unexpectedly delicate elsewhere. An endless catastrophe seen from above. The energies intimated in these works are beyond human control, bigger than all of us.” He lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

 

 

 

 

 

Davis Human Rights Lecture Series: Change Begins With Your Own Liberation

Photo of Gilda Gonzales.

Thursday, February 13
7–8:30 PM

Gilda Gonzales became CEO of Planned Parenthood Northern California (PPNorCal) on June 5, 2017. She provides the executive leadership for one of the largest Planned Parenthood affiliates in the country, which delivers care to 88,000 patients at 18 health centers as well as education and advocacy programs throughout 20 Northern California counties. She is the first Latina to serve as CEO of a California Planned Parenthood affiliate, which she initially joined in February 2014 as senior vice president of external affairs. 

She has a master’s degree in public administration and a bachelor’s of science in industrial psychology. Gonzales is an Alameda County Women’s Hall of Fame inductee, and one of St. Mary’s College of California’s 40 Most Influential Women Graduates. She grew up in California’s Central Valley and currently lives in Oakland with her husband, Ken Wysocki, Ph.D.

The Davis Human Rights Lecture Series is co-sponsored by the UC Davis Human Rights Studies Program and the Manetti Shrem Museum.

 

 

 

Robert Arneson’s “Black Pictures”: Race, Politics and Personal Pain

Photo of Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw

Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw

Sunday, February 23
2:30 PM

This talk examines a controversial group of art works made by Robert Arneson toward the end of his career. Created with great passion and in a variety of media, these objects show the artist wrestling with complex ideas about racial stereotyping, political demagoguery and his own identity as he simultaneously battled the debilitating cancer that would take
his life in 1992.

In winter 2020, Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw is serving as the Manetti Shrem Museum’s first Visiting Museum Researcher. Shaw studies issues of race, gender, sexuality and class in the art of the U.S., Latin America and the Caribbean. She has taught art history and American studies at Harvard University, the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Washington. Shaw has published extensively; her most widely read titles include Seeing the Unspeakable: The Art of Kara Walker (2004) and Portraits of a People: Picturing African Americans in the Nineteenth Century. She has curated several major exhibitions, notably, Represent: 200 Years of African American Art for the Philadelphia Museum of Art (2015), and Kara Walker: Virginia’s Lynch Mob and Other Works for the Montclair Art Museum in New Jersey (2018).

 

 

Art Studio Visiting Artist Lecture Series: Jonathan Calm

Photo of artist Jonathan Calm.

Thursday, February 27
4:30–6 PM

A native New Yorker, Jonathan Calm is a visual artist in the media of photography and video whose work combines and challenges the aesthetic and ideological tenets of architecture, documentary journalism and sculpture. A central theme is the relationship between photography and urban architecture, and the powerful role of images in the way architectural constructs shape the lives of individuals and communities. Calm’s art practice has been featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions, including Frequency at the Studio Museum in Harlem (2005); Role Play at the Tate Britain (2006); and Rooted Movements at LMAKprojects in New York City (2014). He has been covered in the New York Times, Art in America, the New Yorker, the Village Voice, Artforum and the Washington Post. Calm is an assistant professor of art practice at Stanford University.

 

 

Faculty Book Series

Cover of book Racial Worldmaking with two people looking at a building.

Mark C. Jerng
Racial Worldmaking: The Power of Popular Fiction

Wednesday, March 4
4:30–6 PM

Racial Worldmaking takes up particular popular genres—future war; plantation romance; sword and sorcery; alternate history—in order to analyze how genre formations inform our perceptual organizations of race and world. In doing so, it engages questions central to our current moment: In what ways do we participate in racist worlds, and how can we imagine and build one that is anti-racist?

Mark C. Jerng is a professor of English at UC Davis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The China Shop: Artists in Science Labs

Photo of white and black blobs on red background.

Wednesday, March 11 and Wednesday, June 3
4:30–6 PM

The China Shop is a new faculty-led initiative funded by National Endowment for the Arts’ Art Works project. Conceived by UC Davis professors Timothy Hyde (Art Studio) and Jiayi Young (Design), this unprecedented two-year endeavor creates a space for challenging inquiries at the intersection of disciplines. Playing off the idea of “a bull in a china shop,” artists are invited to work with scientists and their lab staff to repurpose the tools and infrastructure of scientific research in unexpected ways. The paired artist and scientist will discuss their creative work, system of collaboration, and works in progress in two public conversations.

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. We thank the Dean’s Office of Letters and Science, the Office of Research, and the Manetti Shrem Museum for their generous matching support. This event is also a part of the Leonardo Art, Science, Evening Rendezvous (LASER) series and is published in ARTECA, a curated spacefor essential content linking the arts, sciences and technologies (MIT Press).

 

 

 

Art Studio Visiting Artist Lecture: Francis Stark

Photo of Francis Stark's artwork featuring three black canvases.
Frances Stark, Black Flag, Oil on canvas, four panels total: 72 x 93 in. each. Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise, New York/Rome

Thursday, March 12
4:30–6 PM

Frances Stark’s drawings, collages, videos, PowerPoint presentations, performances and paintings have been extensively exhibited in museums and galleries worldwide. In 2017, a new suite of her paintings was included in the Whitney Biennial; her cinematic opera, The Magic Flute, premiered at LACMA; and an earlier work was featured in the Venice Biennale. In 2015, Stark’s sprawling mid-career survey, UH-OH: Frances Stark 1991-2015, opened at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, before traveling to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Stark’s work has been included in prominent exhibitions such as the 2013 Carnegie International, the 2011 Venice Biennale and the 2008 Whitney Biennial. She lives and works in Los Angeles, California.

 

 

Art Studio Visiting Artist Lecture: Beatriz Cortez

Photo of artwork by Beatriz Cortez with glass and metal in a dome shape.
Beatriz Cortez, 105 Point Hood Shield from Trinidad: Joy Station (2019), at Craft Contemporary. Courtesy of the artist and Commonwealth and Council, Los Angeles. Photo: Gina Clyne.

Thursday, April 2
4:30–6 PM

Beatriz Cortez has lived in the United States since 1989. She received a master of fine arts in art from the California Institute of the Arts in 2015, and a doctorate in literature and cultural studies from Arizona State University in 1999. Cortez’s work explores simultaneity, life in different temporalities, and different versions of modernity, particularly in relation to post-war memory and loss, migration and imagining possible futures. She has had several solo exhibitions in Los Angeles, and her work is currently on view as part of Chronos, Cosmos: Deep Time, Open Space at the Socrates Sculpture Park, N.Y.; Mundos Alternos: Art and Science Fiction in the Americas at the Queens Museum, N.Y.; and Candelilla, Coatlicue, and the Breathing Machine at Ballroom Marfa, Marfa, Texas.  She teaches in the Department of Central American Studies at California State University, Northridge.

 

 

 

The Architecture of the Museum in the Age of Spectacle: Presentation by Talinn Grigor

Photo of Talinn Grigor

Sunday, April 26
2:30–4:30 PM

Art History Chair Talinn Grigor will discuss the relationship of architecture to the institution of the museum and will touch on the Manetti Shrem Museum’s architecture and how it shapes visitors’ experience. Grigor received her doctorate from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2005. Her books include Building Iran: Modernism, Architecture, and National Heritage under the Pahlavi Monarchs (2009); Contemporary Iranian Art: From the Street to the Studio (2014); and Persian Kingship and Architecture: Strategies of Power in Iran from the Achaemenids to the Pahlavis, with Sussan Babaie (2015). Her articles have appeared in the Art Bulletin, Getty Journal, Third Text, Future Anterior and Iranian Studies, among others.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Creative Writing Reading Series: Public Executions

Artwork called 'Baby Teeth' with blue and white abstract objects.

Tuesday, April 28
4:30–6 PM

Katie Peterson and Joe Wenderoth, core members of the UC Davis Graduate Writing faculty, will present. Both poets will read and perform original works. Unlike a traditional poetry reading, this multimedia event will feature live and recorded sound and video projection. Katie Peterson is the author of four poetry collections, including A Piece of Good News. Joe Wenderoth is the author of many collections of poetry and prose, including Letters to Wendy’s.

The performance contains mature themes, and is not recommended for children.

 

 

 

Art Studio Visiting Artist Lecture: Meg Shiffler

Photo of Meg Shiffler.

Thursday, April 30
4:30–6 PM

Meg Shiffler has been the galleries director for the San Francisco Arts Commission (SFAC), the arts agency of the City and County of San Francisco, since 2005. She curates exhibitions featuring artists who provoke dialogue around contemporary art and broad civic and social issues. She has launched new initiatives including a global Sister City exhibition exchange program, and a residency program placing artists within city departments. Shiffler has taught in the School of Interdisciplinary Studies at the San Francisco Art Institute, and is a member of Stanford Universities’ Creative Cities Working Group. She produced a regular column about collaboration for SFMOMA’s Open Space blog, and writes about contemporary art and multidisciplinary practice. She contributed to Show Me the Picture (Chronicle Books, 2019), a survey of photographs by Jim Marshall, and a catalog of her exhibition Jeremy Fish: O Glorious City (Chronicle Books, 2017).

 

 

 

The Scholar as Curator Series

Photo of book by Roger Sansi.


The Anthropologist as Curator: Roger Sansi (Universitat de Barcelona) 

Wednesday, May 6
4:30–6 PM

Why do contemporary art curators define their work as ethnography? How can curation illuminate the practice of contemporary anthropology? Does anthropology risk disappearing as a disciplinary heritage within the general model of the curatorial? Roger Sansi, editor of the upcoming book The Anthropologist As Curator (2020), shares the process of collecting the perspectives of international scholars working at the intersection of anthropology, contemporary art, museum studies, curatorial studies and heritage studies.

Programmed by Tarek Elhaik (associate professor, Anthropology) and the AIL: Anthropology of the Image lab in partnership with the Manetti Shrem Museum and with support of the Mellon-Sawyer Series on Branding Cultural Heritage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The China Shop: Artists in Science Labs

Photo of white and black blobs on red background.

Wednesday, June 3
4:30–6 PM

The China Shop is a new faculty-led initiative funded by National Endowment for the Arts’ Art Works project. Conceived by UC Davis professors Timothy Hyde (Art Studio) and Jiayi Young (Design), this unprecedented two-year endeavor creates a space for challenging inquiries at the intersection of disciplines. Playing off the idea of “a bull in a china shop,” artists are invited to work with scientists and their lab staff to repurpose the tools and infrastructure of scientific research in unexpected ways. The paired artist and scientist will discuss their creative work, system of collaboration, and works in progress in two public conversations.

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. We thank the Dean’s Office of Letters and Science, the Office of Research, and the Manetti Shrem Museum for their generous matching support. This event is also a part of the Leonardo Art, Science, Evening Rendezvous (LASER) series and is published in ARTECA, a curated spacefor essential content linking the arts, sciences and technologies (MIT Press).